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20131202
20131210
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council, and with the pentagon. this country it's included downing street, the cabinet security e national advisor, gchq themselves, and dinas committee. we've consulted more than 100 times with the agencies in order be aware of their concerns before we published them. so i suppose my question is, have you gone through all of 53,000 documents? and have some been excluded from publication? will they not be appearing. have others been put in the yes, publication? >> i think -- in terms of ublishing documents, i think we've published 26. >> i'm referring to the ones yet been. not >> we did a few more pages of ocuments that have been redacted. publishnot expect us to a huge amount of more. 26 over six months. the ones that have been communicated to the united states. because i understand some of hose, the names have been redacted and some of them haven't. how did you go about deciding names to redact and which not -- the guardian ear, has not used any names. in the rare occasion where we've used individual slides from documents which had names on them, we absolutely redacted those. it's been s
, and with the pentagon. this country it's included downing street, the cabinet office, the national security advisor, gchq themselves, and the dinas committee. we've consulted more than 100 times with the agencies in order to be aware of their concerns before we published them. >> and so i suppose my question is, have you gone through all of the 53,000 documents? and have some been excluded from publication? will they not be appearing. have others been put in the yes, okay for publication? >> i think -- in terms of publishing documents, i think we've published 26. >> i'm referring to the ones which have not yet been. >> we did a few more pages of documents that have been redacted. i would not expect us to publish a huge amount of more. 26 over six months. >> what about the ones that have been communicated to the united states. because i understand some of those, the names have been redacted and some of them haven't. how did you go about deciding which names to redact and which not -- >> let's be clear, the guardian has not used any names. in the rare occasion where we've used individual slides from
are and what we are doing on behalf of national security. to give you some idea about the 5irection of one of the big agencies that we have that are every day, 24 hours a day, seven days a week in 142 countries around the world with 17,000 people, doing the nation's business. we have some talented men and women and i will talk about them. john, thank you very much. i want to thank for the great introduction. i want to thank the institute of world politics and the staff that puts these things on. it is important that we keep doing i think it is a really important endeavor that we keep doing this. politicstute of world and your personal dedication to hosting this annual lecture is a testament to the institute's commitment to training a new generation of critical thinkers. the professionals in this room who recognize the value of studying history when confronting modern issues of national security and world politics. as early as 1932, there was a which begins with a surprise attack on pearl harbor. part of the curriculum. i have a graduate degree. in march of 1931, intelligence reports warn o
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3